Monday, March 30, 2009

Cover Up: Wolverine #4 (of 4)


I love this cover, for no other reason than it's one of the few cover depictions of Wolverine in which he's not popping his goddamn claws.

Oh, alright — I also like the fact the Wolverine #4 (of 4) cover plays up the idea of Logan embracing a samurai-style mindset, which is my favorite iteration of the character. The art by Frank Miller is lean and expressive (moreso in the actual issue than in this bare-bones cover), and manages to give Wolverine a playfully dangerous appearance.

Speaking of a dangerous appearance, if you take a not-so-close look at the image it's probably obvious my copy has seen better days. But considering it's been through a basement flood, at least five moves and the irony-laden horror of being crushed by a pile of comics, it's remarkable that it has survived at all. Truly, Wolverine cannot be killed.

Oh, and one more thing; the first two issues of this mini-series? Total claw-poppin'.

4 comments:

rob! said...

I think one of the nice parts about these Wolverine covers is that Marvel didn't gum them up with blurbs and text.

Maxo said...

Good point, Rob. They are very clean, and it can be pretty effective. Now that you've mentioned it, I'm kind of surprised at Marvel's restraint.

Sea_of_Green said...

Oh, but this was at the beginning of the "Frank Miller Is God" era -- so Marvel was pretty much willing to let him do what he wanted -- within reason, of course. :-) NO ONE has given him more free rein than DC, though.

Maxo said...

Yup - if the Internet can be believed, Miller's "Elektra Gets Killed by Bullseye" story was published just months before the Wolverine series was released. I'm sure he was already working on it, but I'll bet Marvel was happy to go along with anything Miller was producing at that point.

But yeah, geez DC, c'mon! Everyone needs an editor, y'know? And I don't buy the whole, "Miller's just satirizing and commenting on the superhero genre" business, either. I used to love his stuff, but I haven't been excited about anything Frank Miller's done in a long time.